Enter 21 Divisions

Hello Mystics, 

it has been awhile since I have written here, and as such- I pray everyone has been in good spirits! Looking back at the stuff I was posting back then *EESH*. Time to change all of that. Reintroducing myself, especially for the new readers here- Jeff Kent, otherwise known to the “Masses” as Bawon. Knowing what I know now, I do not like that title, it stems from a time where I thought I was “cool”, or honestly a bit more than I was. I will only continue to go by that name as a simple handle, and nothing more.

Moving on! Since we last spoke I had been looking to venture into a spiritual house within Haitian Vodou. I have an adoration for the lwa  and their mysteries . The orisha…. I find their beauty in the Mpungo under the sciences of Palo. I was approached by a “Blanc” down in Louisiana, whom said Ogou  Feray had something for me, however looking back at it, I would rather get my lwa from someone indigenous to the culture, or who has a higher application of melanin. I would have been initiating into his assongwe tradition/ lineage of Haitian Vodou. 

For those of you who do not know what “Assongwe” means, it refers to the lineage or line of which Haitian tradition that society practices. There are many different, traditions or lineages. The assongwe lineage serves with the Asson, a spiritual rattle, used to call down the lwa.

Had I continued down that path, I would have:

  1.  Been initiated into the Assongwe  lineage of Vodou possibly under Mama Lola’ s lineage.
  2. Paid 1000% too much. White man cannot give me vodou, (while vodou is for everyone) they can hardly receive it.  I was originally advised $7,000.00, but he dropped it to $5,000.00…(yay).
  3.  Been initiated under a Oungan, into a house, who I don’t have a relationship with. Not the best idea.

So fast forward to today, I have stepped into the path of initiating fully into a house within 21 Divisions Vudú. I received *Ki Loa Tet* from my now spiritual father whom in my lineage, we acknowledge as a, Papa Boko. I received my mysteries during my 27th birthday (literally). I take that as a HUGE spiritual sign that we are walking in the right direction. I’ve gained new friends, I have lost old acquaintances as well- I have learned more about who I am as a man. I am happy to serve The Misterios. I pray that I serve them well, I pray that I uphold the religion.
Gracias La Misericordia.

-Bawon.

Daily Meeting

Found Ezili Danto a few months back, holding Ti Jean Petro in her arms. I make it a point daily to go and bring her some water. A little libation left to show my appreciation for everything that had been done for me until now. You don’t need to do something elaborate to recognize the Spirits. Remember them, and they will remember you.

The Last of the Vodou’s

THE LAST OF THE VODOUS

by Lafcadio Hearn

from An American miscellany, vol. II, (1924)
originally published in Harper’s weekly, November 7th, 1885

In the death of Jean Montanet, at the age of nearly a hundred years, New Orleans lost, at the end of August, the most extraordinary African character that ever gained celebrity within her limits. Jean Montanet, or Jean La Ficelle, or Jean Latanié, or Jean Racine, or Jean Grisgris, or Jean Macaque, or Jean Bayou, or “Voudoo John,” or “Bayou John,” or “Doctor John” might well have been termed “The Last of the Voudoos”; not that the strange association with which he was affiliated has ceased to exist with his death, but that he was the last really important figure of a long line of wizards or witches whose African titles were recognized, and who exercised an influence over the colored population. Swarthy occultists will doubtless continue to elect their “queens” and high-priests through years to come, but the influence of the public school is gradually dissipating all faith in witchcraft, and no black hierophant now remains capable of manifesting such mystic knowledge or of inspiring such respect as Voudoo John exhibited and compelled. There will never be another “Rose,” another “Marie,” much less another Jean Bayou.

It may reasonably be doubted whether any other negro of African birth who lived in the South had a more extraordinary career than that of Jean Montanet. He was a native of Senegal, and claimed to have been a prince’s son, in proof of which he was wont to call attention to a number of parallel scars on his cheek, extending in curves from the edge of either temple to the corner of the lips. This fact seems to me partly confirmatory of his statement, as Berenger-Feraud dwells at some length on the fact that the Bambaras, who are probably the finest negro race in Senegal, all wear such disfigurations. The scars are made by gashing the cheeks during infancy, and are considered a sign of race. Three parallel scars mark the freemen of the tribe; four distinguish their captives or slaves. Now Jean’s face had, I am told, three scars, which would prove him a free-born Bambara, or at least a member of some free tribe allied to the Bambaras, and living upon their territory. At all events, Jean possessed physical characteristics answering to those by which the French ethnologists in Senegal distinguish the Bambaras. He was of middle height, very strongly built, with broad shoulders, well-developed muscles, an inky black skin, retreating forehead, small bright eyes, a very flat nose, and a woolly beard, gray only during the last few years of his long life. He had a resonant voice and a very authoritative manner.

At an early age he was kidnapped by Spanish slavers, who sold him at some Spanish port, whence he was ultimately shipped to Cuba. His West-Indian master taught him to be an excellent cook, ultimately became attached to him, and made him a present of his freedom. Jean soon afterward engaged on some Spanish vessel as ship’s cook, and in the exercise of this calling voyaged considerably in both hemispheres. Finally tiring of the sea, he left his ship at New Orleans, and began life on shore as a cotton-roller. His physical strength gave him considerable advantage above his fellow-blacks; and his employers also discovered that he wielded some peculiar occult influence over the negroes, which made him valuable as an overseer or gang leader. Jean, in short, possessed the mysterious obi power, the existence of which has been recognized in most slave-holding communities, and with which many a West-Indian planter has been compelled by force of circumstances to effect a compromise. Accordingly Jean was permitted many liberties which other blacks, although free, would never have presumed to take. Soon it became rumored that he was a seer of no small powers, and that he could tell the future by the marks upon bales of cotton. I have never been able to learn the details of this queer method of telling fortunes; but Jean became so successful in the exercise of it that thousands of colored people flocked to him for predictions and counsel, and even white people, moved by curiosity or by doubt, paid him to prophesy for them. Finally he became wealthy enough to abandon the levee and purchase a large tract of property on the Bayou Road, where he built a house. His land extended from Prieur Street on the Bayou Road as far as Roman, covering the greater portion of an extensive square, now well built up. In those days it was a marshy green plain, with a few scattered habitations.

At his new home Jean continued the practice of fortune-telling, but combined it with the profession of creole medicine, and of arts still more mysterious. By-and-by his reputation became so great that he was able to demand and obtain immense fees. People of both races and both sexes thronged to see him–many coming even from far-away creole towns in the parishes, and well-dressed women, closely veiled, often knocked at his door. Parties paid from ten to twenty dollars for advice, for herb medicines, for recipes to make the hair grow, for cataplasms supposed to possess mysterious virtues, but really made with scraps of shoe-leather triturated into paste, for advice what ticket to buy in the Havana Lottery, for aid to recover stolen goods, for love powers, for counsel in family troubles, for charms by which to obtain revenge upon an enemy. Once Jean received a fee of fifty dollars for a potion. “It was water,” he said to a creole confidant, “with some common herbs boiled in it. I hurt nobody; but if folks want to give me fifty dollars, I take the fifty dollars every time!” His office furniture consisted of a table, a chair, a picture of the Virgin Mary, an elephant’s tusk, some shells which he said were African shells and enabled him to read the future, and a pack of cards in each of which a small hole had been burned. About his person he always carried two small bones wrapped around with a black string, which bones he really appeared to revere as fetiches. Wax candles were burned during his performances; and as he bought a whole box of them every few days during “flush times,” one can imagine how large the number of his clients must have been. They poured money into his hands so generously that he became worth at least $50,000!

Then, indeed, did this possible son of a Bambara prince begin to live more grandly than any black potentate of Senegal. He had his carriage and pair, worthy of a planter, and his blooded saddle-horse, which he rode well, attired in a gaudy Spanish costume, and seated upon an elaborately decorated Mexican saddle. At home, where he ate and drank only the best–scorning claret worth less than a dollar the litre–he continued to find his simple furniture good enough for him; but he had at least fifteen wives–a harem worthy of Boubakar-Segou. White folks might have called them by a less honorific name, but Jean declared them his legitimate spouses according to African ritual. One of the curious features in modern slavery was the ownership of blacks by freedmen of their own color, and these negro slave-holders were usually savage and merciless masters. Jean was not; but it was by right of slave purchase that he obtained most of his wives, who bore him children in great multitude. Finally he managed to woo and win a white woman of the lowest class, who might have been, after a fashion, the Sultana-Validé of this Seraglio. On grand occasions Jean used to distribute largess among the colored population of his neighborhood in the shape of food–bowls of gomboor dishes of jimbalaya. He did it for popularity’s sake in those days, perhaps; but in after-years, during the great epidemics, he did it for charity, even when so much reduced in circumstances that he was himself obliged to cook the food to be given away.

But Jean’s greatness did not fail to entail certain cares. He did not know what to do with his money. He had no faith in banks, and had seen too much of the darker side of life to have much faith in human nature. For many years he kept his money under-ground, burying or taking it up at night only, occasionally concealing large sums so well that he could never find them again himself; and now, after many years, people still believe there are treasures entombed somewhere in the neighborhood of Prieur Street and Bayou Road. All business negotiations of a serious character caused him much worry, and as he found many willing to take advantage of his ignorance, he probably felt small remorse for certain questionable actions of his own. He was notoriously bad pay, and part of his property was seized at last to cover a debt. Then, in an evil hour, he asked a man without scruples to teach him how to write, believing that financial misfortunes were mostly due to ignorance of the alphabet. After he had learned to write his name, he was innocent enough one day to place his signature by request at the bottom of a blank sheet of paper, and, lo! his real estate passed from his possession in some horribly mysterious way. Still he had some money left, and made heroic efforts to retrieve his fortunes. He bought other property, and he invested desperately in lottery tickets. The lottery craze finally came upon him, and had far more to do with his ultimate ruin than his losses in the grocery, the shoemaker’s shop, and other establishments into which he had put several thousand dollars as the silent partner of people who cheated him. He might certainly have continued to make a good living, since people still sent for him to cure them with his herbs, or went to see him to have their fortunes told; but all his earnings were wasted in tempting fortune. After a score of seizures and a long succession of evictions, he was at last obliged to seek hospitality from some of his numerous children; and of all he had once owned nothing remained to him but his African shells, his elephant’s tusk, and the sewing-machine table that had served him to tell fortunes and to burn wax candles upon. Even these, I think, were attached a day or two before his death, which occurred at the house of his daughter by the white wife, an intelligent mulatto with many children of her own.

Jean’s ideas of religion were primitive in the extreme. The conversion of the chief tribes of Senegal to Islam occurred in recent years, and it is probable that at the time he was captured by slavers his people were still in a condition little above gross fetichism. If during his years of servitude in a Catholic colony he had imbibed some notions of Romish Christianity, it is certain at least that the Christian ideas were always subordinated to the African–just as the image of the Virgin Mary was used by him merely as an auxiliary fetich in his witchcraft, and was considered as possessing much less power than the “elephant’s toof.” He was in many respects a humbug; but he may have sincerely believed in the efficacy of certain superstitious rites of his own. He stated that he had a Master whom he was bound to obey; that he could read the will of this Master in the twinkling of the stars; and often of clear nights the neighbors used to watch him standing alone at some street corner staring at the welkin, pulling his woolly beard, and talking in an unknown language to some imaginary being. Whenever Jean indulged in this freak, people knew that he needed money badly, and would probably try to borrow a dollar or two from some one in the vicinity next day.

Testimony to his remarkable skill in the use of herbs could be gathered from nearly every one now living who became well acquainted with him. During the epidemic of 1878, which uprooted the old belief in the total immunity of negroes and colored people from yellow fever, two of Jean’s children were “taken down.” “I have no money,” he said, “but I can cure my children,” which he proceeded to do with the aid of some weeds plucked from the edge of the Prieur Street gutters. One of the herbs, I am told, was what our creoles call the “parasol.” “The children were playing on the banquette next day,” said my informant.

Montanet, even in the most unlucky part of his career, retained the superstitious reverence of colored people in all parts of the city. When he made his appearance even on the American side of Canal Street to doctor some sick person, there was always much subdued excitement among the colored folks, who whispered and stared a great deal, but were careful not to raise their voices when they said, “Dar’s Hoodoo John!” That an unlettered African slave should have been able to achieve what Jean Bayou achieved in a civilized city, and to earn the wealth and the reputation that he enjoyed during many years of his life, might be cited as a singular evidence of modern popular credulity, but it is also proof that Jean was not an ordinary man in point of natural intelligence.

(End.)

The Santeria Experience

Just finished reading this book The Santeria Experience- A Journey into the Miraculous by author Migene Gonzalez Wippler. I picked up the book awhile ago at some used book store around my mom’s house when I first got into Vodun, or rather began looking for something entertaining and at least somewhat insightful on the Spirituality. I had ran through all of the YouTube videos I could find, and after I had gotten a reading from Mambo Odette about my teacher being a man, I was reaching out at basically any type of information I could find on EVERYTHING leading out of Africa. 

I had remembered reading how the Afro- Cuban slaves of the Diaspora had began the traditions of Santeria and figured this would be a good book to read, as I was stepping out of Christianity and it’s Catholic themes and rules might have provided a bit of struture in my life. I mean as long as we keep into account the syncritism of the religions there shouldn’t be much confusion over what the intentions of the workings are.

While there are three different renditions of the book, I picked up the latest which the author describes in detail different instances in her life where her experiences with Santeria could be clearly recanted, and how it shifted and affected her relationships. While the author does not provide the deep internal secrets of Santeria, she does give a next to beginner instructional guide of how to go about delving deeper into the religion, if you can manage to think of the right questions and do a little digging yourself. As well, the author provides a little book of spells in the end of the book for the reader to try and practice at home. 

All in all the book is vastly entertaining and I would recommend to anyone looking to just get a bit more knowledge of different cultures, would like to see how Vodou connects throughout the world, or even wants to get started in Santeria. 

Hope this review helped, Enjoy!

Principles of Vodun (Continued)

Principles of Vodun

Greetings, I come with honor. I hope that you take this knowledge and value it, if you find it useful for you.

  • Vodun, is not a religion. Religion is the deification of a culture. Religion typically goes about convincing people if you want to save your soul, you must be apart of this particular group. Vodun only asks that you be of service to others.
  • Vodun means, In all that you do, know that the spirit is present.
  • In Africa Vodun was known as Ifa, in the Yoruba, Afa in Ghana. In Cuba we know about Obeah, or Palo Mayombe, Quimbanda, and Santeria. These are all children or branches of Vodun.

While there are many different entities and paths in Vodun, the common thought of the 7 African Powers are heavily observed. These are a few notes, and sparked the basis for my walk in Vodun. With these principles, none can go wrong.

  • Bondye -The Most High comes before all, and is already with you at all times.

-The Lwa is already with you, you just have to know how to call on them.

  • The Ancestors gave us the word “Loa” they did not give us “God.”
    • French word for Law= “Loi”; pronounced the same way as “Loa” (low-uh, or low-ah) .
    • The word Loa or Lwa = Law
    • this poses the question, is a law a God?

Da / Damballah Wedo

In Haiti known as Damballah Wedo, or Damballah La Flambeau. In Africa the spirit is known as Da. Da is respresented as a white snake, pure and flexible. Da represents the Law of life. The law of basic biological material life. This Lwa tells us in order to have life you must have flexibility and mobility.  If none of these are present, no biological material life can be successfully had.2000px-VeveDamballah.svg.png

 

 

 

 

Legba

Papa Legba holds the 1st principle of “Social Life”. In africa Esu Ellegba,

Esu means,” The Divine Interpreter”Dominant term for many parts of Africa. Ellegba means, “The One who Fights”.

  • When speaking on the aspects of Legba within Haitian. It is held by some that between the names, the best aspect for the particular situation at the time would be, the aspect of Legba.

legbaveveLegba is the law which demands, that in order for us to have a successful social society, we must  open the doorway of oppurtunityfor others.

“Give your brother a chance, help your sister advance.”

This is the spirit of Legba. Legba is nota spooky little something that pops up and makes mischief. This is why we serve the loa and not adore them. Secondly, we must always build upon ourselves, and develop a good character. We must work on ourselves, and build in ourselves the traits to help towards a better society for all. This is the principle of Legba.

Ayizan

Ayizan holds the principle of organization and structure. Two people cannot co-exist if there is no organization and structure. Ayizan is a female principle. If we are to follow the first principle of Legba, opening opportunity for others, then it must be organized and structured and cannot be done in chaos.220px-VeveAyizan.svg

 

Ogoun

The Fourth principle is Ogou or Ogoun, in Africa also known as Ogu. The principle of Ogou teaches us to have courage.800px-VeveOgoun.svg

  • There is no life if there is not courage.
  • Courage is truth, that is served for the betterment of the community. When you are courageous, you speak the truth.
  • Courage has source. Gains power from the truth.
  • Courage must not be confused with greed, as courage is for the benefit for the group as a whole. If this principle is not taken to benefit the group as a whole then there is no courage.

Oshun 

oshun

The Fifth principle is Oshun or Ochun. The principle of Oshun teaches us to love

  • Love is to create harmony amongst different things.
  • One must have good character to produce a proper basis for love.

(Mutant Principle) Jaltibwa

The principle of handling immediate confrontation. Fighting and handling business on the spot. 

Ghede

The principle of facing, that which you don’t see or don’t want to see. 

 

Principles of Vodun

The First 4 Principles of Vodun

Greetings, I come with honor. I hope that you take this knowledge and value it, if you find it useful for you.

  • Vodun, is not a religion. Religion is the deification of a culture. Religion typically goes about convincing people if you want to save your soul, you must be apart of this particular group. Vodun only asks that you be of service to others.
  • Vodun means, In all that you do, know that the spirit is present.
  • In Africa Vodun was known as Ifa, in the Yoruba, Afa in Ghana. In Cuba we know about Obeah, or Palo Mayombe, Quimbanda, and Santeria. These are all children or branches of Vodun.

While there are many different entities and paths in Vodun, the common thought of the 7 African Powers are heavily observed. These are a few notes, and sparked the basis for my walk in Vodun. With these principles, none can go wrong.

  • Bondye -The Most High comes before all, and is already with you at all times.

-The Lwa is already with you, you just have to know how to call on them.

  • The Ancestors gave us the word “Loa” they did not give us “God.”
    • French word for Law= “Loi”; pronounced the same way as “Loa” (low-uh, or low-ah) .
    • The word Loa or Lwa = Law
    • this poses the question, is a law a God?

Da / Damballah Wedo

In Haiti known as Damballah Wedo, or Damballah La Flambeau. In Africa the spirit is known as Da. Da is respresented as a white snake, pure and flexible. Da represents the Law of life. The law of basic biological material life. This Lwa tells us in order to have life you must have flexibility and mobility.  If none of these are present, no biological material life can be successfully had.2000px-VeveDamballah.svg.png

 

 

 

 

Legba

Papa Legba holds the 1st principle of “Social Life”. In africa Esu Ellegba,

Esu means,” The Divine Interpreter”Dominant term for many parts of Africa. Ellegba means, “The One who Fights”.

  • When speaking on the aspects of Legba within Haitian. It is held by some that between the names, the best aspect for the particular situation at the time would be, the aspect of Legba.

legbaveveLegba is the law which demands, that in order for us to have a successful social society, we must  open the doorway of oppurtunity for others.

“Give your brother a chance, help your sister advance.”

This is the spirit of Legba. Legba is nota spooky little something that pops up and makes mischief. This is why we serve the loa and not adore them. Secondly, we must always build upon ourselves, and develop a good character. We must work on ourselves, and build in ourselves the traits to help towards a better society for all. This is the principle of Legba.

Ayizan

Ayizan holds the principle of organization and structure. Two people cannot co-exist if there is no organization and structure. Ayizan is a female principle. If we are to follow the first principle of Legba, opening opportunity for others, then it must be organized and structured and cannot be done in chaos.220px-VeveAyizan.svg

 

Ogoun

The third principle is Ogou or Ogoun, in Afria also known as Ogu. The principle of Ogou teaches us to have courage.800px-VeveOgoun.svg

  • There is no life if there is not courage.
  • Courage is truth, that is served for the betterment of the community. When you are courageous, you speak the truth.
  • Courage has source. Gains power from the truth.
  • Courage must not be confused with greed, as courage is for the benefit for the group as a whole. If this principle is not taken to benefit the group as a whole then there is no courage.

Out of the South for the weekend.

The Bawon and I landing in New York it wasn’t a long flight, about 3 ½ hours- took forever to take off though. I don’t think many people noticed him in my pocket, then again maybe they did or maybe he didn’t want them to notice. Either way we got out the South for a few days at least.

Spiritual Properties of Wood

Ebony (Macassar)
Wood Origin:
Celebes Islands, Maluku and Borneo (Asia)

Gender Association:
Masculine and Feminine, equality

Planetary Association:
Venus, Jupiter

Elemental Association:
All 5 (fire, water, earth, air, spirit), emphasis on Water

Other magical properties:
Power to change, positive luck, balance of energy, breaks down social barriers.

Ebony is well-known as the most powerful magical wood. Scott Cunningham, trusted writer of over 30 books about magic and the occult, writes about ebony, “Ebony wood is protective and so is used in making amulets. Ebony wands give the magician pure, unadulterated power.”

The power of ebony is non-discriminating. It is useful for any magical practice and with any element. Macassar ebony differs slightly from the energy of Gaboon ebony, in that it is more centered around emotions and intuition. This wood would be especially useful in the seeking of spiritual knowledge and exploring intuition and emotion. It would not be especially useful for healing.

Historically, this wood was used in the handles of Samurai swords.

Eucalyptus
Wood Origin:
Australia, Various

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
Mars

Elemental Association:
Earth

Other magical properties:
One of the strongest healing woods known, eucalyptus trees have been used for medicines for centuries as well as for ritual items pertaining to healing. The energy of this wood is good and pure, clean like the earth from which it is born. This wood is highly recommended for any purpose combating illness or promoting good health.

Eucalyptus is also primarily associated with positive luck, especially if related to knowledge. For instance, using eucalyptus in a ritual seeking a positive result to pending news (tests, interviews) would prove beneficial. Worn as a charm, this wood would promote positive luck for the wearer. It is also an excellent tool in divination.

Katalox
Wood Origin:
Central America

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Saturn, Jupiter

Elemental Association:
Earth, Water

Other magical properties:
Katalox is primarily a wood of balance, especially the balance between light and darkness. It helps one achieve self-knowledge, the ability to see one’s own life as others might, and to decide which aspects may be out of balance or in need of correction. It allows one to feel “at home” in their own skin, complete by acknowledgement of the whole self and seeing the whole of reality, not just the parts people often wish to see. Useful both for those who dwell too much in the light, having a difficulty coping with death, sorrow, or mysterious subject-matter, or those who constantly dwell in darkness, refusing to let the light in. Balance is the key. This wood brings about acceptance on many levels.
For those who have anger issues, Katalox is an excellent tool for overcoming them. The wood is introspective and grounding, slowing anger and allowing one to think clearly and see situations in a more logical and understanding manner.

This wood is a wonderful tool for change. Those who have a difficult time coping with change will find that they are able to accept and learn from change better. Those who have a difficult time bringing about change in their life will find it easier to do so.

This is also an excellent tool for exploring divination, mysteries, and other forms of “dark” spirituality.

Kingwood
Wood Origin:
Brazil

Gender Association:
Masculine and Feminine

Planetary Association:
Saturn, Moon, Jupiter

Elemental Association:
Spirit, Water

Other magical properties:
The primary energies of this wood are strength and protection. It is associated with the very assertive masculine and the warrior-feminine. It will block out unwanted energy, forming an impenetrable protective barrier. This wood brings with it the ability to exert one’s will upon the world, creating needed or desired change.
The power of this wood blasts away all ambiguity. It will allow one to discover their true spiritual path, locking in only the most sincere beliefs, allowing the rest to fall away. It clarifies confusion.

This wood is an excellent healing wood, closely tied with willpower. It would also be excellent for luck magic or divination. Also excellent for curses or other offensive magic, this is not a wood for novices or the untrustworthy.

Koa
Wood Origin:
The Hawaiian Islands

Gender Association:
Split between masculine and feminine, different associations for each

Planetary Association:
Masculine: Jupiter, Saturn, Sun, Mercury

Feminine: Moon, Venus, Sun, Mercury

Elemental Association:
Masculine: Water

Feminine: Fire

Other magical properties:
Koa is one of the most curious of woods we have had the pleasure of working with. It has both a masculine and a feminine side, almost completely separate.

Masculine properties: The energy associated with the masculine aspects of this wood are duality and balance, like the tides. This energy is deeply connected with the ocean, which is alternately giving and destructive. To truly utilize the masculine properties of this wood, one must be able to recognize and become comfortable with the ebb and flow of its energy. Deity: Kanaloa, Hawaiian God of the Sea

Feminine properties: Centered around the element of fire, Koa in its feminine aspect brings creativity, beauty, and wisdom, and strength. It also brings a fiery energy, capable of destructive power or the power to overcome strife. Deity: Pele, Hawaiian Fire Goddess

Leopardwood (Lacewood)
Wood Origin:
Australia

Gender Association:
Both masculine and feminine

Planetary Association:
Mars and Venus

Elemental Association:
Water

Other magical properties:
Leopardwood is very useful in divination, especially obtaining news from afar. It is also associated with positive luck, a gambler’s wood. The energy of this wood is overall very positive, and it would be an excellent wood for use in almost any ritual or spell, but especially those dealing with luck or divination.

Lignum Vitae
Wood Origin:
South America and parts of Europe

Gender Association:
Masculine and Feminine

Planetary Association:
Sun, Jupiter, Venus

Elemental Association:
Earth, Water

Other magical properties:
The hardest, densest wood in the word, Lignum Vitae means “long life” in Latin. This tree is also called the “Tree of Life” as well as “Iron Wood.” The wood is so dense and heavy that it will not even float in water. It comes with a long history and legend. This naturally green wood has been used for time untold in construction due to the fact that it is so hard and dense. Because it has a large amount of resin within it as well as its density, it is naturally lubricated and was thus used as ball bearings on ships.

The greatest legend about this wood is that Merlin the Wizard carried a staff and/or wand made from Lignum Vitae. This legend appears in both literature and ancient writings about the legend of Camelot. If true, it is hardly surprising. The energy within the wood is perfectly suited to a great man such as Merlin.

This wood has a profoundly positive energy. The overall energy of the wood can be summed up as “the power and strength of goodness.” Its strong connections with the sun, Jupiter, and luck energy make the wood an ideal tool for any worker of positive magick. The energy about the wood is very healing, in both physical and spiritual matters. The energies within the wood would also be excellent for divining information from far away as well as close to home.

This wood represents the end of strife and the beginning of a new, positive, cycle.

Mahogany (Genuine)
Wood Origin:
Honduras

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Earth, Mars, Mercury, Moon

Elemental Association:
Primary: Earth, Secondary: Fire

Other magical properties:
Mahogany is an interesting wood mainly because, while most woods have a variety of differing uses, this one is very specialized. This wood is very focused on fertility, growing. It has a very powerful bond with the Earth, and will channel Earth energy better than any other.

Secondary to fertility, this wood has other uses as well. Enhancing intuition, strengthening bonds with blood relatives (especially the mother/son relationship), and exploring and clarifying goals are all possible uses for Mahogany. This wood would not be good for divination.

Mahogany (African)
Wood Origin:
Africa

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
Moon

Elemental Association:
Primary: Spirit, Secondary: Fire

Other magical properties:
This is one of the most spiritually focused of all woods, and would be best used in magic dealing with anything non-physical. Divination and spiritual growth and guidance are its primary properties. It is also an excellent wood for healing spells, though mostly for emotional and spiritual healing.

Maple
Wood Origin:
Various

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
Moon, Jupiter

Elemental Association:
Spirit, Water

Other magical properties:
Maple is a fascinating a beautiful wood due largely to the great deal of variation in its appearance. Some maple wood is without any interesting grain, while some has an amazing wavy (called “curly”) appearance with remarkable translucence. And some maple is known as “Bird’s Eye” maple because it has tiny little spots in the grain, like miniature knotholes, throughout the wood. And still other maple is “spalted,” or crossed with very dark lines within the grain. It is sometimes hard to tell that all of these woods come from the same type of tree.
Maple is one of the most spiritual woods in existence. Because of this, the primary use of the wood is that of spiritual healing. It is also amazing when working with moon magick.

Maple is a traveler’s wood. Those who are always on the move and changing will feel right at home with this type of energy. It allows a person to focus in on the choices in any situation, eliminating luck and chance. It enhances intellectual pursuits and learning.

Mopane
Wood Origin:
Zimbabwe

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Mars, Saturn

Elemental Association:
Air

Other magical properties:
Communication and awareness are the two main energies present in this wood. It has the ability to add or remove blockages from communication. This makes it excellent for treating communication disorders, such as speech impediments or autism. It is also a good tool for blocking out unwanted communication, both physical and spiritual in nature.
This wood helps one let go of past pains and move forward in life. It brings a general positive energy, making past hurts seem not as important. It will aid in planning out and attaining future goals.

Myrtlewood
Wood Origin:
North America

Gender Association:
Balanced masculinity and femininity

Planetary Association:
Venus, Jupiter, Mars

Elemental Association:
Primary: Earth, Secondary: Fire

Other magical properties:
This wood is all about balanced energy. Oftentimes, people will focus only on one or two details of their lives, neglecting the rest. This wood’s energy helps us to step back and see the big picture, not getting overwhelmed by the details. It helps to balance the energies within us or a situation. Myrtlewood will aid in decision making, but not luck.

This wood is very versatile. It is good for healing, creating abundance, and for nurturing passionate love. However, it has a very honest energy and will not tolerate deception or “creative truth” in any of your workings with it.

Olivewood, Italian
Wood Origin:
Italy

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Saturn, Sun

Elemental Association:
Earth, Spirit

Other magical properties:
Balance between the spiritual and physical aspects of life is often difficult to attain. The central energy within this wood bring about this balance. It will allow a person to travel between the spiritual and physical words at ease, and thus is an excellent tool for astral projection or communication with spirits or the dead. This energy is somewhat chaotic due to its extremely powerful connection with the spiritual realm, and may bring unwanted communication as well.
The spiritual journeys brought on by this wood can bring about self-love and a balance of energies, as well as a greater understanding of life and death.

Rebirth.

Osage Orange
Wood Origin:
USA, Great Plains

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Sun, Jupiter

Elemental Association:
Spirit, Earth, Fire

Other magical properties:
Named after the Osage tribe of the Great Plains region, this wood was used by those people to make bows and other items. An extremely strong and straight-grained wood, it is still the preferred wood to use for a recurve hunting bow or crossbow. This wood is famous for its ability to repel household pests and resist rot.

This wood is extremely spiritual in nature, especially related to matters that also coincide with earth energy. It would be ideal for communicating with spirit animals or guides. It is perfect for spiritual healing, such as astral healing. This wood aides in the pursuit of goals and passions.

Padauk
Wood Origin:
Africa, Gabon region

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Mars

Elemental Association:
Fire

Other magical properties:
A powerful yet chaotic wood, Padauk is not at all recommended for those new to The Craft. The energy of this wood is constantly changing, randomly fluctuating. It would, however, be an amazing wood for healing magic if one could learn to harness the chaotic energy within. In the hands of the inexperienced, it would likely do more harm than good.

Pear
Wood Origin:
Various, fruit wood

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Mercury, Sun

Elemental Association:
Earth, Fire

Other magical properties:
Extremely earth-centric energy, very grounded. This type of wood is best used for healing, and will appeal mostly to those who have a passion to heal. This wood would not be useful for spiritual exploration, such as astral projection, divination, etc, but is extremely useful in earth-centric matters. It brings a creative, inspiring energy to the home. This wood is excellent for use with money and prosperity spells.

Pink Ivory
Wood Origin:
South Africa, Zimbabwe, Mozambique

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Sun, Mars

Elemental Association:
Spirit, Water

Other magical properties:
Pink Ivory was the royal wood of the Zulu people of Africa. Legend states that the Zulu king would carry a staff crafted from this wood, as well as ornamental jewelry, and any others caught possessing the wood of the Pink Ivory tree were to be punished by beheading. This included foreigners in their own country and abroad. Many have said that this legend was simply invented by the Africans to drive up the price of the wood as an export item, but that is unclear. It is a protected tree in South Africa, and only cut down by limited permit, making it one of the most rare and expensive crafting woods in the world. The tree itself is a fruit-bearing tree, and the fruit is traded in marketplaces across southern Africa.

Energetically, this wood is strongly associated with the sun, spiritual healing, and strength. “Change” and “growth” are the key words for this wood. It gives the power to bring about needed change in one’s own life, to learn and grow toward healthy goals. It grants the ability to leave the past behind, and look to the future, a brighter future not marred by the baggage of our past. This is especially true in home situations, where home life is a burden. It allows one to see and feel their home anew, leaving behind past hurts, or to seek a new home if that is desired.

Spiritually, this wood is not a good tool for communication with otherworldly spirits, but an excellent tool for healing one’s own spirit or the spirits of other living people or animals. It will aid in magic that seeks to heal emotional hurts, or cure inhibitions that cripple social behavior. It will aid in opening channels of communication between people (or between people and animals).

This wood is also an excellent tool for love magic, or magic having to do with luck or wealth.

Poplar
Wood Origin:
Europe and North America

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Sun, Mercury, Saturn, Venus

Elemental Association:
Spirit, Water, Fire

Other magical properties:
This wood has incredibly diverse energy, allowing it to be an all-purpose wood for magickal workings. While containing almost entirely masculine energy, it is also influenced by the power of Venus, bringing a softer, intuitive, feminine energy as well.

Spiritual energy is strongest within this wood, followed by the power of water. Water and spirit combined make this wood excellent for any working dealing with change, acts of will, or evocation (this is the wood we use to create our athames). This is also an excellent healing wood.

The diversity of the energy in this wood makes it useful for evocation as well as banishment rituals.

Purpleheart
Wood Origin:
Central and South America

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
Venus and Mercury

Elemental Association:
Spirit, Air

Other magical properties:

A spiritual wood, purpleheart is excellent for use in divination magic. It also enhances energy dealing with creativity and knowledge. One of the best woods when dealing with spiritual healing and health issues, purpleheart would be especially useful in eradicating the negative energies that create strife in the home.

Redheart
Wood Origin:
South America, various

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Jupiter, Sun, Moon

Elemental Association:
Earth, Water

Other magical properties:
Containing an overall bright and carefree energy, redheart is an excellent wood for those seeking to be able to focus more on the “here and now” rather than dwelling on past or possible future events. It allows one to follow their whims, set aside their fears, and move their life in an overall positive direction. It does not distract one from real threats, but rather removes the fear and doubt that can cloud our judgment and make us imagine things worse than they may actually be. This wood will aid a person in finding their personal truth, free of self-deception.

Self-esteem is not to be underrated. Most of us live under certain assumptions about how people view us or our beliefs that may not be entirely accurate. The power of this wood will help a person set aside those assumptions, to feel free to speak their mind and express their views without fear of what others may think. It is a freeing energy, without self consciousness or darkness and doubt. It allows us to see this life for what it is, not what we imagine it to be, and to love it.

Rosewood (Bolivian)
Wood Origin:
Bolivia

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
Mars, Moon, Venus

Elemental Association:
Spirit, Fire

Other magical properties:
This wood’s energy is primarily feminine, and focused on spiritual, intuitive health and beauty. Bolivian Rosewood is motherly, spiritual, and nourishing. It lends a boost to intuitive thought and feeling, and is thus excellent in divination and scrying. A healing wood, rosewood can be used in all healing rituals but is especially effective in spiritual healing. In matters dealing with beauty, rosewood can be very effective. Carried or worn as a charm, this wood will enhance female beauty and feminine grace. It would be good for love spells as well, but only those conducted with maturity and wisdom. Frivolous energies will not be enhanced by this wood.

Rosewood (East Indian)
Wood Origin:
India

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
Moon, Venus, Saturn

Elemental Association:
Fire, Earth, Some Water

Other magical properties:
East Indian Rosewood has a very magical energy, but that of dark magic, mystery. Darkness is not a negative thing, but it is that which is not usually focused upon, the hidden things in life that escape the notice of most people. This wood will help a person work with these energies. For this reason, this wood is highly recommended for all magic involving divination, communication with the dead, and internal truth.

In addition, this wood is excellent for magic involving health and beauty, physical things that you can see and touch. Physical healing or the clearing up of cosmetic flaws would be good uses for this wood.

A very grounded wood, it can also help bring about positive change, even if that change does include some conflict. It can help bring about a feeling of being at home.

Rosewood (Honduran)
Wood Origin:
Honduras

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
Venus, Saturn, Moon

Elemental Association:
Spirit, Water, Fire, Air (in order of strength)

Other magical properties:
Being a member of the rosewood family, this wood shares many properties with other rosewoods while also having a distinctly different energy all its own.

Unlike some other rosewoods, Honduran Rosewood is not purely feminine, allowing a small amount of masculine energy to also come through. The most powerful energy within the wood is spiritually focused. It would best be used for creative therapy and healing. This is a life-changing, positive, feminine energy.

Like most rosewoods, this wood is excellent for love magick and bringing passion into life. Also like most rosewoods, it is good for bringing about change and for boosting intuitive or psychic abilities. But unlike other rosewoods, the energy of Saturn allows this wood to also block out unwanted energies in magickal workings. This can be excellent for isolating only the desired aspect of the wood.

Sagebrush
Wood Origin:
Western United States

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Sun

Elemental Association:
Fire, Spirit

Other magical properties:
Though considered an unsightly desert weed by most people, the Native American people held the sagebrush plant in particular reverence. It was the only wood they used to burn in their sweat lodges, creating a greasy dark smoke that helped them achieve a higher state of consciousness. In their culture, this wood could not be collected until the collector was spiritually purified.
Not surprisingly, the primary energy of this wood is cleansing and purifying itself. It helps to clear away negativity and doubt, helping a person to focus on their true passions and to gain valuable insights. It reveals needed goals, and creates drive. It can help a person remove the obstacles they have found placed between themselves and the things they seek in life, by removing blockages within oneself.

This would also be an excellent tool for divination, but not with dark energy. It would not help with scrying, but would be an aid in meditative divination or spiritual journeys.

Tulipwood
Wood Origin:
Brazil

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
The Moon and Venus

Elemental Association:
Water

Other magical properties:
Tulipwood is part of the rosewood family. It carries with it many of the traits of other rosewoods, with a few unique traits as well. A very powerful feminine energy radiates from this wood. It would be extraordinary if used in moon magic, and anything having to do with creativity, intuitions, and beauty, and natural cycles. This would be an excellent wood for divination.

The primary element of this wood is water. Water usually brings with it a calm and peaceful effect. However, the energy of this wood contains the full spectrum of water energy, both peaceful and destructive. It is as though the very energy of the Goddess rests within the wood; beautiful and serene, yet powerful and proud.

The wood carries an overall positive energy, and also may be used to bring about affluence and wealth. One of the most powerful woods we have ever encountered, with a very diverse and potent energy.

Wenge
Wood Origin:
Tropical West Africa

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Saturn, Venus

Elemental Association:
Fire, Air, Spirit

Other magical properties:
Wenge is not only a beautiful wood to look at, but also a wonderful magical tool. It possesses a very relaxed energy, encouraging slow, even thought. It is the perfect tool for meditation, especially for those who have trouble slowing their thoughts. It is also a healing wood, useful for a variety of physical as well and emotional healing applications. Worn as a charm, this wood would create a more even mood and centered thought. It would also calm the temper and encourage learning. This wood is not for the impatient, if they hope to utilize it for quick power.

Whitewood
Wood Origin:
Romania

Gender Association:
Masculine and Feminine

Planetary Association:
Saturn, Moon, Sun

Elemental Association:
Air

Other magical properties:
Anyone who has purchased cheap lumber at a hardware store that is not specifically labeled pine has probably purchased whitewood, usually imported from Romania. It is a very fast growing tree related to the pine tree, but without the aroma or prevalence of sap.
This wood contains a very dark energy. Darkness is that which is mysterious and often frightening to people. It is extremely useful for many types of magic, including divination, communication with the spirit world, death, and exploring the mysteries of life. This wood is protective, allowing one to explore their dark side without getting lost within it. Overall, this wood helps one understand things that most people choose to ignore or may not even know exist.

It can bring healing through communication, and a general comfort through knowledge. It is a very grounded wood, despite the prevalence of air energy.

Yellowheart (also known as Satinwood)
Wood Origin:
Various, from Florida USA to Brazil

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Mars, Saturn, Moon

Elemental Association:
Water is strongest, but exhibits energy in all elements but fire

Other magical properties:
This wood contains a very powerful, and often strange, energy. Though it is overall positive, it is a wood highly influenced by luck and the energies which surround it. The results may be unpredictable, though usually not dangerous (unlike African Padauk).

The wood is highly in tune with the planet Mars. Mars brings both strife and war, or the energy to overcome these things. In this case, the energy is very tied up with life energy as well, possibly indicating that the wood could be used to influence health issues, both spiritual and physical.

Water energy is the strongest elemental force within this wood, and with it the cyclical energy of the moon. Water brings a peaceful energy, a stillness. This energy will be strongest on the full moon, and nearly nonexistent during a new moon.

The most interesting aspect of this wood is the prevalence of the planet Saturn. Saturn blocks Venus and the element of Fire in this wood’s energy, keeping creative thought, desires, and ambitions at a minimum. This would be highly useful for meditation, though may be a hindrance in other endeavors.

Yew, Pacific
Wood Origin:
North America, Pacific Northwest

Gender Association:
Masculine

Planetary Association:
Mercury, Jupiter, Moon

Elemental Association:
Earth, Spirit

Other magical properties:
Though not European Yew, the Pacific Yew is nearly identical to the species of tree that was used to create the infamous English Longbow. This species of Yew was instead used by the native people of North America to make spears and bows of great power and sacred history.

The main property of the Pacific Yew is focus. It grants the ability to block out the things that do not matter and concentrate on the matters at hand. It is an amazing aid in the pursuit of knowledge and goals. It brings a balance of the physical and spiritual worlds, the ability to concentrate on either with equal clarity.

Not a recommended wood for divination or luck, but highly recommended for use with the pursuit of goals, including love.

Zebrawood
Wood Origin:
Africa, Gabon region

Gender Association:
Feminine

Planetary Association:
Moon

Elemental Association:
Air

Other magical properties:
The primary associations of this wood are the moon, love, luck, wisdom, creativity, and beauty. It is the only wood we have encountered that has absolutely no masculine energy.

Though there is a very positive energy about this wood, it is not recommended for healing magic. It would, however, be an excellent tool in dealing with love magic, and anything relating to feminine energy or the moon. It would also be a good tool for divination.